​Regular Program at the CBE

Even though most of our schools offer a regular program, no two are quite the same. All schools teach according to Alberta Education’s mandated curriculum, however a school’s focus, optional courses and school activities are as unique as every school.​​​

Working Together Positively for the Success of the Child

Our teachers are dedicated to teaching the "whole" child and we have a number of programs that support us in this. 

Helping Students Prepare to Learn

  • Morning Workouts – research indicates that physical activity to start the school day improves student focus and learning.
  • ZONES of Regulation – teaches students about their emotional and mental state and how to self-regulate. Research indicates that students who are able to self-regulate are more successful in school over time than even their less regulated gifted peers.
  • Mindfulness and Trauma Sensitivity – improve how we teach our students as well as their intra and inter relationship skills.

Helping Students Build Basic Skills

  • Literacy Focus –  through a balanced literacy program, grouping students for improved learning and targeting students for individual support, we work hard to have all students reading by the end of grade three, or we have a good understanding of why this has not happened. To provide additional literacy support, we have a home reading program for our younger grades and participate in Books for Kids and the Calgary Flames, Reading, Give It a Shot.
  • Numeracy Focus –  students need to have a solid grasp of basic skills to access higher-level math. Nevertheless, this isn't enough, because they also need to be able to think mathematically. Through task design and a special math focus through games for building basic skills, we address both needs with students.
  • Disciplinary Literacy – this is teaching students to “think like”… architects, chemists, botanists, authors and so on.  It helps them understand that to understand a subject, it’s important to approach it in a certain way. It’s also a great way to help them learn!

Providing Meaningful Learning

  • Teaching and Learning is based on research that follows the ideals of the Galileo Network, Teaching Effectiveness Framework. Inquiry and real life connections to school curriculum are the starting points for task design. Teachers use formative assessment to give them a clear understanding of students' learning and what the next best steps are. 
  • Our overarching question this year is, “Where can reading take me?” We are in our second year of an Indigo Love of Reading grant and are focusing our professional development on the literacy skill of reading this year. Our focus book is titled, “A Child of Books” and it is written by Oliver Jeffers and Sam Winston.
  • Makerspace – the new makerspace and the philosophy behind it provide both incredible learning opportunities and soft skills such as perseverance, the iterative nature of learning and experimenting and how failure is a step in that process to name just a few.

All of the above is of course woven into the elementary Programs of Studies. Even our physical education and music specialists are part of the team that works to help children learn and to have their learning "stick" over time.

Preparing for Tests

Parents can help their children prepare for tests in many ways! Read on to find out a few tips on helping your child do his or her best when writing a test.

  1. Make sure that your children prepare ahead of time by scheduling regular review time for the test at least one week in advance. Even 15 minutes of review each night in the week before a test can make a big difference. If they start a week ahead, they shouldn't be spending more than 20-30 minutes reviewing each evening.
  2. Take a look at your children's notes and materials and help them get organized. If they prefer learning by hearing, they should be reading their notes out loud, singing the information, or even talking the information over with you. If they prefer learning by seeing, they should be reading their notes and looking at charts and pictures of the information - mind mapping is a great way for these types of learners to make connections. If your children prefer learning through doing, they should be moving while they read notes, write different types of notes (sentences, mind maps, pictures, acronyms, etc.), or doodle while they read their notes - as long as the "doodles" fit with the subject they are reviewing.
  3. The evening before a test, make sure your children eat a healthy supper because it is the nutrients from this meal that their bodies will be using during the test. Make sure your children get enough to drink too - avoid drinks high in sugar. Avoid cramming for the test, but take a last look at the information. Balance the mental activity with some good physical exercise, even if it's a run around the block! 
  4. Make sure that your children get a good night's sleep. The brain makes connections when we are asleep.
  5. The morning of the test, make sure your children get up early enough not to have to rush and stress and to have a healthy breakfast - don't forget the milk, water, or juice.
  6. Be encouraging and calm, stress keeps very necessary oxygen from making it to our brains.

Program, Focus & Approach

Working Together Positively for the Success of the Child

Our teachers are dedicated to teaching the "whole" child and we have a number of programs that support us in this. 

Helping Students Prepare to Learn

  • Morning Workouts – research indicates that physical activity to start the school day improves student focus and learning.
  • ZONES of Regulation – teaches students about their emotional and mental state and how to self-regulate. Research indicates that students who are able to self-regulate are more successful in school over time than even their less regulated gifted peers.
  • Mindfulness and Trauma Sensitivity – improve how we teach our students as well as their intra and inter relationship skills.

Helping Students Build Basic Skills

  • Literacy Focus –  through a balanced literacy program, grouping students for improved learning and targeting students for individual support, we work hard to have all students reading by the end of grade three, or we have a good understanding of why this has not happened. To provide additional literacy support, we have a home reading program for our younger grades and participate in Books for Kids and the Calgary Flames, Reading, Give It a Shot.
  • Numeracy Focus –  students need to have a solid grasp of basic skills to access higher-level math. Nevertheless, this isn't enough, because they also need to be able to think mathematically. Through task design and a special math focus through games for building basic skills, we address both needs with students.
  • Disciplinary Literacy – this is teaching students to “think like”… architects, chemists, botanists, authors and so on.  It helps them understand that to understand a subject, it’s important to approach it in a certain way. It’s also a great way to help them learn!

Providing Meaningful Learning

  • Teaching and Learning is based on research that follows the ideals of the Galileo Network, Teaching Effectiveness Framework. Inquiry and real life connections to school curriculum are the starting points for task design. Teachers use formative assessment to give them a clear understanding of students' learning and what the next best steps are. 
  • Our overarching question this year is, “Where can reading take me?” We are in our second year of an Indigo Love of Reading grant and are focusing our professional development on the literacy skill of reading this year. Our focus book is titled, “A Child of Books” and it is written by Oliver Jeffers and Sam Winston.
  • Makerspace – the new makerspace and the philosophy behind it provide both incredible learning opportunities and soft skills such as perseverance, the iterative nature of learning and experimenting and how failure is a step in that process to name just a few.

All of the above is of course woven into the elementary Programs of Studies. Even our physical education and music specialists are part of the team that works to help children learn and to have their learning "stick" over time.

Preparing for Tests

Parents can help their children prepare for tests in many ways! Read on to find out a few tips on helping your child do his or her best when writing a test.

  1. Make sure that your children prepare ahead of time by scheduling regular review time for the test at least one week in advance. Even 15 minutes of review each night in the week before a test can make a big difference. If they start a week ahead, they shouldn't be spending more than 20-30 minutes reviewing each evening.
  2. Take a look at your children's notes and materials and help them get organized. If they prefer learning by hearing, they should be reading their notes out loud, singing the information, or even talking the information over with you. If they prefer learning by seeing, they should be reading their notes and looking at charts and pictures of the information - mind mapping is a great way for these types of learners to make connections. If your children prefer learning through doing, they should be moving while they read notes, write different types of notes (sentences, mind maps, pictures, acronyms, etc.), or doodle while they read their notes - as long as the "doodles" fit with the subject they are reviewing.
  3. The evening before a test, make sure your children eat a healthy supper because it is the nutrients from this meal that their bodies will be using during the test. Make sure your children get enough to drink too - avoid drinks high in sugar. Avoid cramming for the test, but take a last look at the information. Balance the mental activity with some good physical exercise, even if it's a run around the block! 
  4. Make sure that your children get a good night's sleep. The brain makes connections when we are asleep.
  5. The morning of the test, make sure your children get up early enough not to have to rush and stress and to have a healthy breakfast - don't forget the milk, water, or juice.
  6. Be encouraging and calm, stress keeps very necessary oxygen from making it to our brains.
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​Middle Years at the CBE

Middle years learning refers to education offered to students between the ages of 10-15. These years are critical in keeping our students on the path to high school completion and their career futures. Keys for student success include: participating in hands-on, purposeful and relevant learning; creating positive relationships with peers, teachers and other adults; and being actively involved in the community and feeling supported by family, businesses and other organizations that surround them.

Learn more about our students in their middle years, including how their learning will change and how you can support your child, visit the CBE website.​

​Exploring Career Choices

For Grades 5 to 9 at the CBE, we offer Career & Technology Foundations (CTF). This is an inquiry-based, hands-on program that focuses on essential skills common to occupational areas, and our students personalize their learning based on their interests and passions.​​​

Today we sent a year end message to families about our planning for school re-entry this fall. Re-entry survey results and a transportation reminder. Check your email to read it online: https://t.co/qFKMVzfIHS #yycbe #WeAreCBE https://t.co/2V4iqs1Xqo

Due to increased traffic, we’re experiencing issues with the online report card feature of PowerSchool. Check out these instructions on how to view your report card marks/indicators. Sorry for the inconvenience! https://t.co/8FwiAq3JGW #yycbe #WeAreCBE https://t.co/luTVdQ5J6M