Course Outcomes & Evaluation

Course Outcomes and Evaluation

Evaluation in English Language Arts (ELA) is varied and continuous, ranging from assessments of polished written work, responses to literature/text, discussions, projects, presentation, and tests.  Students are be required to create a variety of personal and analytical responses to the literature and other print and non-print texts.

Students can expect to create responses in a variety of ways, both print and non-print.  These may include:

  • factual and/or fictional narratives
  • informative and/or persuasive essays
  • commentaries
  • articles and/or reviews
  • poetry
  • oral and/or visual and/or multimedia presentations

The final grade is weighted according to the chart below. Assignments may fit under one or more outcomes.

Outcome
Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to…
Outcome
Weightings
Outcome 1 – Explore
…explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences
12%
Outcome 2 – Comprehend
…comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively
35%
Outcome 3 – Manage
… manage ideas and information
12%
Outcome 4 – Create
…create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
35%
Outcome 5 – Collaborate
…respect, support and collaborate with others
6%

Assignment Re-write Policy

If a student receives a grade of “Poor” or “Limited” on one or more categories of the rubric for a major writing assignment, this demonstrates that they do not fully understand an aspect of that writing format. We require students to attend tutorial to talk about how to demonstrate these skills to increase the mark. A new topic (and reading) will be provided to complete a rewrite. Re-written work must be completed under comparable conditions to the original assignment.

A Word on Intellectual Honesty

Students must develop their own understandings and impressions. The act of taking and using someone else's writing or ideas and indicating it is their own is plagiarism (literary theft).  It is a serious offense.  Any work taken off the Internet or other sources, which is not credited to its source, is plagiarism. Plagiarised assignments will be recorded as a zero grade, and a note will be made on their academic record.  Parents or guardians may be notified.  This policy is outlined in the LBHS Student Handbook.

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Transportation pre-registration is now open for the 2021-22 school year. Log into your My CBE/PowerSchool account to pre-register before June 6. https://t.co/OrC6nz8Hyp #yycbe #WeAreCBE https://t.co/XQO7Rx7jXN

Both Simon Fraser School and A.E. Cross School have recognized with National Inclusive Education Awards: https://t.co/9X1U7VEbFF Check out this news story about the principal at Simon Fraser School #WeAreCBE https://t.co/uymu2soIce

One of our specialized transportation providers was recognized with the Transportation Opportunities Award from the City of Calgary. Congratulations to DREAMS #WeAreCBE https://t.co/ORvQzNAeSh