Parent Resources

Helpful Reading Tips

  • Don’t rush your child. Respect your child’s individual rate of development.
  • Read to you child daily
  • Encourage your child to read for 15 minutes every day. Pick a time of day that works best for your child and create a comfortable space to read.
  • Let your child choose books he/she is interested in reading.
  • Read to your child daily. Older siblings can be involved in reading to younger brothers or sisters. Talk about the books you read together.
  • Have a quiet reading time when your whole family reads. It is good modelling for your child to see you read novels, newspapers and magazines.
  • Use everyday activities to teach reading. For example, your child can help you read grocery lists, recipes, catalogues, food containers and mail.
  • Take your child to visit the public library.
  • Build a home library with your child.
  • Make reading fun!

Good Readers

  • Use the picture clues – Pictures support the story and provide the reader with important information.
  • Think about what they are reading - Reading should make sense; it is not just sounding out the words. The words together should communicate an idea to the reader.
  • Listen to how the words sound – Listen to the beginning, middle and ending sounds of the word and then guess the difficult word. Say the word in the sentence to see if it sounds right.
  • Look for little words inside big words – Hidden words help the reader pronounce and identify the larger unfamiliar word.
  • Search and listen for similarities – Do words rhyme or have similar letter patterns?
  • Sound words out - Sound out the first letter of an unfamiliar word and then continue reading the rest of the sentence. The word will often pop into the reader’s head.
  • Backtrack and read again when the words do not make sense – Rereading helps good readers to remember what they are reading and helps them to predict a word that could fit in the sentence. When good readers read the sentence again they may notice clues they missed the first time.
  • Skip over a difficult word and read on – By reading to the end of the sentence a good reader can often figure out the unfamiliar word. It is a good idea to go back and read the whole sentence again to see that it makes sense and sounds right.
  • Ask questions and make predictions – Good readers read to get answers to their questions and to find out if their predictions are right

Helpful Links:

This section is for helpful links for parents. We will continue to add in new resources as we find them:

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RT @OSGAndrew: This week, we spent time reflecting and learning about the experiences of children in residential schools. We discussed how children should feel in school, as well as how we can help others feel safe and welcome at school. https://t.co/o8U57HNteJ

RT @OSGPaddock: Room 15 brainstormed, designed, reflected and modified our version of an Orange Shirt Day t-shirt. We’re so proud to have our message displayed. Ask me about the choices we made and about our learning this week. #TruthAndReconciliationthrougheducation https://t.co/Czyxw5vqco

RT @ms_wolkowski: We are each designing shoes that will be displayed to honor & remember all the Indigenous children who were forced to attend Residential Schools. @Indigenous_cbe #WeAreCBE https://t.co/Vsfmox84rd

RT @Indigenous_cbe: Please join @yyCBEdu @cityofcalgary @CCSD_edu on September 30 from 10am-12:30pm @fortcalgary (750 9th Ave SE) to commemorate the National Day for Truth & Reconciliation🧡Listen to Elders, Survivors, a student performance, free lunch & more #WeAreCBE https://t.co/CJg9cJY4uE

RT @UsihChristopher: The CBE is committed to action toward Truth and Reconciliation. Sept 30 is National Day for Truth and Reconciliation & #OrangeShirtDay. This year, the CBE is guided by the question posed by Kainai Blackfoot Elder Casey Eagle Speaker, who asked us, “What is something you can do?” https://t.co/HQ2H47NKO4