Parent Resources

Helpful Reading Tips

  • Don’t rush your child. Respect your child’s individual rate of development.
  • Read to you child daily
  • Encourage your child to read for 15 minutes every day. Pick a time of day that works best for your child and create a comfortable space to read.
  • Let your child choose books he/she is interested in reading.
  • Read to your child daily. Older siblings can be involved in reading to younger brothers or sisters. Talk about the books you read together.
  • Have a quiet reading time when your whole family reads. It is good modelling for your child to see you read novels, newspapers and magazines.
  • Use everyday activities to teach reading. For example, your child can help you read grocery lists, recipes, catalogues, food containers and mail.
  • Take your child to visit the public library.
  • Build a home library with your child.
  • Make reading fun!

Good Readers

  • Use the picture clues – Pictures support the story and provide the reader with important information.
  • Think about what they are reading - Reading should make sense; it is not just sounding out the words. The words together should communicate an idea to the reader.
  • Listen to how the words sound – Listen to the beginning, middle and ending sounds of the word and then guess the difficult word. Say the word in the sentence to see if it sounds right.
  • Look for little words inside big words – Hidden words help the reader pronounce and identify the larger unfamiliar word.
  • Search and listen for similarities – Do words rhyme or have similar letter patterns?
  • Sound words out - Sound out the first letter of an unfamiliar word and then continue reading the rest of the sentence. The word will often pop into the reader’s head.
  • Backtrack and read again when the words do not make sense – Rereading helps good readers to remember what they are reading and helps them to predict a word that could fit in the sentence. When good readers read the sentence again they may notice clues they missed the first time.
  • Skip over a difficult word and read on – By reading to the end of the sentence a good reader can often figure out the unfamiliar word. It is a good idea to go back and read the whole sentence again to see that it makes sense and sounds right.
  • Ask questions and make predictions – Good readers read to get answers to their questions and to find out if their predictions are right

Helpful Links:

This section is for helpful links for parents. We will continue to add in new resources as we find them:

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RT @sidhu_nicole: In Gr 1/2, we’ve been listening to @calgarylibrary #Treaty7Storytime and Crystal Many Fingers share her Blackfoot story, “Creator and the Seven Animals,” and students made connections to Treaty 7 nations and the animal clans AND protecting the land!🧡 @OSGeiger @Area4CBE @yyCBEdu https://t.co/Rn6VbiPXvV

RT @yyCBEdu: There are no classes for CBE students on Friday, Nov 26 because it’s a system-wide non-instructional day. Have a safe long weekend and please continue to follow all public health measures. #WeAreCBE https://t.co/cAWIKT8nVR

Students in grades 1 and 2 explored the symbolism of the Métis flag and read “The Giving Tree” by Leah Dorian. They reflected on how the story connects to spirit, heart, body and mind. #CBEIndigenousEd https://t.co/WR61vEMlnS

RT @sidhu_nicole: Our class does a full body scan after lunch recess and choose the zone we feel best matches. Any blue, yellow or red @ZonesOfReg we have a problem solving chat. Ss choose from a menu of calming tasks to help get them regulated and ready for learning. @OSGeiger @Area4CBE @yyCBEdu https://t.co/mfFe0L50OG

Grade 3 & 4 students practiced creating and decoding new words. “This is helping me to sound out.” “I have to think….is this a real word or not? Does it make sense?” https://t.co/zMdP0AAHUP